• Boyd Goldie, an orthopaedic doctor in london, has started working with Ultimaker 2+, a software that converts medical scans to printable models. This free open software adds to the charm of 3D printing of the models, which help the doctor to get most of this technology.

  • Within Reach Design Challenge by MatterHackers Ultimaker e NABLE and Pinshape

    MatterHackers, Ultimaker, e-NABLE and Pinshape recently teamed up to launch a design contest- Within Reach. The contests ask to create a 3D printable tool to assist individuals with limited use of their hands and the winners will be judged by Dave Gaylord, Jen and Ivan Owen, Les Hall and Brandy Leigh Scott. The entry can be made till September 6th and prizes include 3D printers from Ultimaker, MatterControl T10 3D Printer Controllers, MatterHackers PRO Series Filament, and MatterHackers gift cards.

  • Eight Year Old gets 3D Printed Prosthetic Hand from CMU Students

    8-Year old Michael Bell was suffering with Moebius Syndrome, a neurological disorder that left him without his left arm. However, he received a 3D Printed Hand from CMU’s MakerBot Innovation Center, Breckenridge where Austin Brittain created the device for him using the e-NABLE template. The device was named Phoneix hand and costs less than $100.

  • IN UTERO 3D Printed Models help Blind Mothers see their Children

    Blind mothers can now visualize the faces of their children using 3D Printed Models from IN UTERO 3D. The family-run company in Poland, IN UTERO 3D uses images from the ultrasound and then creates 3d printed models using Ultimaker printer and Spectrum filament and the process takes around four days before delivering directly to the parents.

  • Students pioneer Scaffold Free Bioprinting with Hacked Ultimaker

    Students at Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich and the Technical University of Munich formed up a team called Team BiotINK and have discovered a way of 3d printing without going through scaffold formation. Using ultimaker 2+ 3d printer and biotink with streptavidin, the 3d printing can now be done without scaffolds and hence reducing the cost of 3d printing.

  • Coronary Microvasculature 300x300 2

    One roadblock to 3D printing complete, functional organs lies in our inability to ensure the engineered tissue will be well nourished with an accessible blood supply.  Presently we have seen attempts at recreating arteries and veins, but successfully ensuring blood flow deep into tissue to the level of the capillary beds has proven elusive. A group of bioengineers and clinicians have pioneered a technique allowing them to print a fibrin patch containing organized endothelial cells, the cellular linining of blood vessels. Not only did the printed patch enhance blood vessel formation, but the engineered vascular tissue actually integrated with the host's own vasculature, improving tissue perfusion of damaged tissues. This research provides a novel technique that may permit printing of larger blocks of tissue and even organs.

  •  MSF Hospital utilizes 3D Printed Prosthetics in Reconstructive Surgeries

    Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), also known in English as Doctors Without Borders, a foundation that reached out to 3D Printing Technology for its hospital to treat war-wounded Iraqis without access to health care. As the reach extended, the MSF Foundation started providing 3D Printed Prosthetics to Syria, Palestine and Libya through the hospital’s reconstructive surgery program. These prosthetics are faster and cheaper to produce using desktop Ultimaker 3D Printer.

  •  Physician drives long way to deliver 3D Printed Prosthetics to Children for Charity

    A 29-year old, Dr. Lars Brouwers is a physician from Tilburg, Netherlands, who is on a mission to deliver 3D Printed Prosthetic Hands to children who faced war violence in Sierra Leone. For the charity, he is also delivering a desktop 3D Printer, Ultimaker 3 with cost of $3,000 but donated for free by Ultimaker. Using a 1995 Saab for three week long drive to Sierra Leone, they will supporting the charitable international Global Minimum organization, and its Innovate Salone program for school children, with their 3D printed prosthetic hands.

  • Researchers Use 3D Printing Cryogenics to Develop Biological Replicas for Tissue Regeneration

    Researchers from Imperial College London (ICL) have developed new 3D Printing Technique to create biological replicas for tissue regeneration. In collaboration with Kings College London, they experimented with 3D Printing and Cryogenics using solid Carbon Dioxide (dry ice) to quickly cool down hydrogel ink and Ultimaker 3D Printer. Once the ink softens, it forms a gel as soft as human tissue, which was then seeded with Dermal Fibroblasts with success.

Contact Info

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8485 E McDonald Dr #550
Scottsdale, AZ 85250

Phone 480.755.1155

Fax: 480-247-4213